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Monday
Jul082013

Bench Press

Fitness: 3x5 across
Bar speed should be slowing down, but all 15 work reps should still be hit today.

Performance: 5/3/1 "1 week"
75%x5, 85%x5, 95%x1+

Post loads to comments.
e3/6
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4 Rounds, Not For Time of:
8 1-Arm Dumbbell Push Presses
8 1-Arm OH Reverse Lunge, alternate legs
4 Weighted Chest-to-Bar Chin-Ups


Perform 8 push Presses and then 8 alternating leg Reverse Lunges with the same arm locked out overhead. Let your non-dominant arm dictate the load. Go heavy but prioritize control and postitions.


Nicole Carroll on Ring Push-Up Variations

Beginner Yoga Workshop at CFSBK with Whitney Hubbard

Saturday, July 13

Date: 2:15-3:45pm
Price: $15
Cap: 16 participants
Location: CFSBK!
Register Here!

Do you think you're "not flexible enough" to do yoga? Have you been kinda-sorta-interested in checking it out before, but you wouldn't go to a studio with a bunch of pretzel-bendy people or a teacher who is telling you to feel the aura of the person's heart chakra next to you? Do you ever have mobility issues that restrict your movements in Crossfit? Are you interested in the complementary aspects of Crossfit and yoga? 
This class will be an introduction to the foundations of a yoga practice, taught with the Crossfit athlete in mind. We'll explore simple breathing exercises (pranayama), break down key poses (asanas), learn a bit about yoga philosophy, and leave time for some long stretches and deep rest. Your body and mind will thank you for this extra bit of recovery, and you'll walk away with useful experience to incorporate into your own AR, other yoga classes, and your regular training.

Email whitneymhubbard(AT)gmail.com with any questions or concerns! And here's a link to my website if you want to find out more about my yoga background/certification or where else I'm teaching: www.yogapeelnyc.com

Women's Wait

In this two-part series, Andréa Maria Cecil explores women in sports and what supporters and critics have to say about the contentious Title IX legislation. In Part 1, Cecil investigates the past, present and future of female athletes. Read it for free in the CrossFit Journal here
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For our female CrossFitters: What have been your experiences with access to athletics and attitudes associated with them through your life?

Reader Comments (15)

On the hunt for a drafting table if anyone has one that they've been thinking of getting rid of, pretty please!

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJB

To add a non-personal note re: Title IX, this article from economists Justin Wolfers and Betsey Stevenson is interesting: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-18/equal-opportunity-in-sports-makes-both-sexes-richer.html

"Boys’ wrestling programs are often portrayed as victims of Title IX. True, they have declined since the law was introduced. The motivating factor, though, is soccer, which has grown enormously in the decades since Title IX was passed and quickly replaced wrestling as a popular sport for boys throughout the country. Overall, more male high school sports programs expanded than shrank after Title IX. Tennis, cross-country and golf have all grown substantially.

Boys may not have suffered, but what did girls gain? The law’s legacy goes far beyond having fun on the playing field. High school athletics confer substantial economic benefits that last throughout participants’ lives. When one compares people with similar educational opportunities, family backgrounds, measures of intelligence and self-esteem, the annual wages of former athletes are, on average, 7 percent higher than nonathletes. Similarly, athletes get almost half a year more education than nonathletes. The gains occur equally for girls and boys."

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJoel W.

I will second everything Joel said. The impact of Title IX on my life is so huge to try and measure it wouldn't give it justice. An active athlete since the age of 4, the ability to be involved and excel at sports has given me a confidence, self awareness and exposure to wins/losses/hard work/defeat that are applicable to almost every part of life. They teach you how to work as a team and leverage various strengths weaknesses of multiple people. The attitudes of people through time have been mixed, particularly during my 13yrs of playing rugby (Women play rugby?!). While I try not to let people's reactions impact me, often they do. However, in all parts of my life, I'm better for having played sports. Hands down. Also - another article I keep close to my heart:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2011/10/12/secret-power-woman-play-team-sports-sarah-palin-meg-whitman-indra-nooyi/

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJenna B-W

What I found most unsettling about the CFJ article was the stats on media coverage of women's athletics and how a lot of the coverage that does happen often revolves around some personal scandal rather than the merits of a female's performance.

July 8, 2013 | Registered CommenterDavid Osorio

David, thanks for posting this and for what you pointed out. I love/hate the line about when women were "allowed" to run marathons. Allowed? Ugh.

I'm not qualified to speak to the bigger issues at play, but on a personal level, I think I’ve both taken for granted that sports and athletic opportunities were available to me, and also been numbed to the history of women’s limited participation by the oblivion afforded by my own place in history. I was really sick when I was little and was told I'd probably have a very weak heart and because of that, my parents put me in sports from as far back as I remember (I credit Jump Rope for Heart for my double-unders ability). I have a gnarly 16-inch scar across my abdomen from the surgery I had as a kid, and throughout high school sports, it was such a reminder that I could do so much more with my body than people imagined.

Despite the opportunities I had, I was also really aware of persisting unequal treatment across gender lines. Even though I probably wouldn't have, I was pissed that I couldn't play football, or even that the cheerleaders rarely cheered at women's games. I made a habit of sneaking into boy's locker rooms for the main purpose (promise) of seeing whether they were bigger and better equipped than ours, and they usually were. I also always hated walking into sporting goods stores and seeing all the women's stuff in bright pink and baby-doll shapes.

But especially on the collegiate and professional levels, athletics are obviously influenced by funding, donors, and general interest, so in some sense, it's basic economics, not prejudice, that women's athletics don't get as much attention. I'm thankful that legislation like Title IX (hopefully) works against that. Though most likely, the economics stems from the prejudice ingrained in our society of what we find entertaining and impressive…

And this concludes my novel for the day. You're welcome.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKate R

OK, I’ll try to say something about today’s QOD, but this subject feels like more than I can wrap my head around.

First of all, I impressed with Jean Stewart and Grace Larsen. That picture of the San Diego Splash completely rocks - #32 looks so confident and tough.

More generally, I think there’s a big difference between playing sports recreationally and playing professionally (or at the collegiate level). Title IX seems to have made a lot of progress expanding women’s access to sports in their younger years and recreationally thereafter. Anecdotally, through high school, I had access to sports and was strongly encouraged to participate. Playing sports was an awesome learning experience and I made a ton of friends. Like Kate said, I took it for granted. I was never good enough to explore playing at the collegiate or professional (ha) level, so I can’t really speak to that.

With respect to professional sports, I’m not surprised that we haven’t seen a big change in people’s viewing preferences or in the media coverage of sports. Changing which sports we watch is a huge cultural shift that won’t happen overnight (and won’t happen just because Congress passed a law). Just look at soccer. Not to say we should stop trying, of course. I’m just not surprised that it’s a struggle. Bob and I were just discussing women’s volleyball after one of our CFSBK softball games. Women’s basketball gets a bad rap for being “boring” but women’s volleyball is anything but. Maybe there’s an opportunity there.

Not to change the subject back to the men, but it will be interesting to see how things change the more and more we learn about how dangerous football really is. Imagine an America without football. What would fill that void?

JJ, please post whatever it is you’re going to say so I can think, “oh, I wish I had said that!” :)

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKMo

A very quick, timely lesson for everyone on the subject of women's sports: take a moment today to Google Marion Bartoli. She just won the women's singles championship at Wimbledon, and upon her victory, BBC presenter John Inverdale quipped to his listeners on Radio 5 live: "Do you think Bartoli's dad told her when she was little: 'You're never going to be a looker, you'll never be a Sharapova, so you have to be scrappy and fight'?"

Wow. Really?

Bartoli responded later in an interview: "It doesn't matter, honestly. I am not blonde, yes. That is a fact. Have I dreamt about having a model contract? No. I'm sorry. But have I dreamed about winning Wimbledon? Absolutely, yes."

Inverdale later backtracked and gave a half-apology, saying: "She is an incredible role model for people who aren't born with all the attributes of natural athletes."

So, to wrap up, just in case you guys didn't know this already, the "attributes of natural athletes" include being tall, thin, muscular, blond, and pretty. Not, oh, I don't know...WINNING FUCKING WIMBLEDON.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKH

As a former minor sport (gymnastics) male athlete, I fully embrace Title IX. I do take issue with the statement that non revenue generating sports have not been effected. I watched as teams were being dropped right and left, one that had present and past olympians on them. I do not have privilege knowledge as to why different schools dropped certain programs, but the mandate of Title IX was parity and percentage of male and female athletes....

Gymnastics, one of the olympics major sports has been decimated at the high school and college level. Wrestling, now that it "will" or might not be included in the Olympics will die. As Jenna put so well, sports add a tremendous amount to a person. It does not matter the sport. When a sport dies, kids lose out.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterk2h2

As a former minor sport (gymnastics) male athlete, I fully embrace Title IX. I do take issue with the statement that non revenue generating sports have not been effected. I watched as teams were being dropped right and left, one that had present and past olympians on them. I do not have privilege knowledge as to why different schools dropped certain programs, but the mandate of Title IX was parity and percentage of male and female athletes....

Gymnastics, one of the olympics major sports has been decimated at the high school and college level. Wrestling, now that it "will" or might not be included in the Olympics will die. As Jenna put so well, sports add a tremendous amount to a person. It does not matter the sport. When a sport dies, kids lose out.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterk2h2

Oh KMo, I bet you say that to all the girls...... my VERY first memory of access to athletics was learning to play catch with my dad. I wanted to play catch with a baseball, (the obvious choice) but he made me try to play with the softball, which was WAY too big for my tiny hands (I was probably like 7), because girls don't play baseball, they play softball. I was confused about the distinction and I hated that giant ball, and I basically gave it up after that day. And now you guys know why I have so many daddy issues.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJJ

I remember how astounded I was when I learned about Title IX legislation-- I couldn't believe they actually had to legislate to get girls access to sports. I don't know why I was so surprised, but my friend who we were hanging out with that night (Brenda Berkman, who had sue to get admission into the NYFD in the 70's) spoke about what a big deal it was to her and I just couldn't believe that only 40 or 50 years ago girls couldn't/didn't play sports all thru school like my classmates did. To me, that's a crime.

The fact that this legislation is considered "contentious" shows us how far we've come and how far we have back-slid, and reminds me of the Supreme Court ruling about voting a couple weeks ago: legislation can be manipulated and exploited, but a so many times in our society, without it there is NO JUSTICE.

July 8, 2013 | Registered CommenterRob Is

6:30 with Melissa and Noah.

Bench press is slowly happening. Today felt steady and manageable. 72x3x5

8e push press 25# these felt good on both sides
8e reverse lunge 20# left side was weaker, but these moved well
4 weighted chin ups 1-5#, 2-4 at 10# unbroken but fought for the last rep each time

5:40 plank. Mare you're my idol!
Mile cool down.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCrystal

6:30 Sweat Fest with MeLo and Noah

45x5 95x5 135x3 155x5 175x3 195x5

After some trouble during 3-week, I was happy to hit 5 on the rep-out today. Felt pretty solid throughout.

WOD with 35# DB for round 1, 40# for the rest, all chins with 20#.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterTodd

bear cam is back

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/brown-bear-salmon-cam-brooks-falls

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commenteruzef

I do not know a whole lot about Title IX (today's comments were v. informative all around), but I was super psyched to see Crystal and Mare light it up plank-wise. Gonna call you both "Plankton" to your face.

Weights moved tonight; I am happy about that in equal measure with plank-fest.

July 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterTom

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